2-stroke noise

10r

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Jul 14, 2017
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#1
Hi all,
I'm new here.
I just installed a 2-stroke kit on my bike. It's an 80 cc, "unbranded" chinese or Japanese type motor.
The kit wasn't too difficult to install and overall works pretty good.
My question is about the sound coming from my clutch area. The motor runs good but there is a rattiling/wining sound coming from what sounds like the clutch area. It happenes if the clutch is engaged or not.
How normal is this?
It turns heads when I drive down the street and I wanted to keep a low profile for obvious reasons.
Any though would be appreciated
 


crassius

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Jul 23, 2012
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#2
did you grease the large & small bevel gears - also the bucking bar needs a LOT of grease

noise should also be reduced a bit as teeth of gears wear smother

look around the forum for thrads about noise dampeners (like an old mouse pad glued into covers)
 

10r

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Jul 14, 2017
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#3
This give me a starting point.
Yes, I greased the bevel gears but not really the bucking bar. There's just a thin coat on it.
I'll add more and do the search you suggested.
I will let you know what happens.
Thanks crassius
 

FurryOnTheInside

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Sep 23, 2013
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#4
Posted by Gearnut in 2010

1. You need to put a peas sized blob of grease right where the two gears contact each other at least every 300 miles or every other fuel tank refill. Don't over do it or you will only be making a bigger mess inside there and risk contaminating the clutch friction pads with grease. If you do not grease the gears regularly, the gears run dry of lubricant. You can figure out the outcome of that.
It is a good idea to wipe out the excess grease that flings off of the gears from inside the gearcase too. You don't want it turning into a grease packed mess. Do not re-use the grease unless you have no better alternative. A q-tip helps you get into in some areas in there.

2. Yes, that is what I am talking about only you need to remove both the bucking bar and ball bearing. (a pencil style magnetic pick up tool helps sometimes) Clean the ball bearing and bucking bar. Pack a blob of grease inside the hole, place the ball bearing back in the hole, put a little more grease in the hole, then put the bucking bar in the hole. Wipe any excess grease off that got squished out. Leave a little grease on the tip of the bucking bar to lubricate where the clutch release cam pushes in on the bucking bar.

3. The clutch gear is the larger of the two gears on the transmission. It is mounted on the clutch hub. There are a whole frigging bunch of teeny loose ball bearings that fit between the clutch ring gear and clutch hub. Don't ever try to separate the ring gear from the hub or all those bearings will go every which way.
Those tiny ball bearings need to be lubricated at the same interval as the transmission gears. Most folks have the best luck with white lithium grease in an aerosol can. You can squish the end of the red straw that comes with the can of grease to a flat tip and work a little grease between the hub and ring gear. It does not take much grease to do it, and if you get too much in there the lithium grease will fling out and contaminate the clutch friction pads.

If you feel especially adventuresome, you can remove the clutch from the shaft, flip the clutch over and there will be a small hole, factory drilled, in the back of it to let you squirt grease directly into the bearing race.


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