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Brakes Adding an additional brake. Need help.

Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Messages
195
My current project is a 1968 Ross Eurotour. It's a single speed with pretty decent coaster brakes.

Well, I'm motorizing it (hence why I'm here), and I'm concerned about the stopping power of coaster brakes alone. Right now the tires are super thin 1 and 3/8, which will be soon taken up to 1.5 inch. I am going to add a caliper brake to the back, I am wondering how feasible it will be, On the back there is a plate with a reflector mounted to it, which would make a logical place to mount a caliper brake. I enclosed a picture.

What do you guys think?
 

Attachments



M

mickey

Guest
I'd put it on the front, if possible. Better stopping power.
 
F

fetor56

Guest
I agree with mickey,much better braking power from the front.
 

srdavo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2006
Messages
3,158
I agree with putting the additional brake on the front.

are you aware that changing to 1.5" tires requires changing wheels too?

so..... best to get your wheels first, then match up brake calipers.
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Messages
195
I agree with putting the additional brake on the front.

are you aware that changing to 1.5" tires requires changing wheels too?

so..... best to get your wheels first, then match up brake calipers.
I have a picture of the front right here. I don't see an easy way to mount a caliper. What do you think?

Yeah, I found some source of wheels at bikepartsusa.com

I can post some links, but none of them say anything about coaster brakes. Otherwise, I haven't found any 26 by 1.5 wheels.

How bad do you think it'll ride with the tires on it?

http://www.bikepartsusa.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?&category=wheel-26_inch&start=0
 

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L

Large Filipino

Guest
If I remember right,if you remove that fork and pop up that chrome cover you should see a mounting hole for brakes. Then drill thru the cover if you want to keep it.
I would leave the tires well enough alone. Just drop the pressure a little. It seems the regular pressure for a pedal bike according to what the tire says is overkill when you add a motor. If you keep the pressure as it states,you'll pop some tires. Drop it down about 5 psi.
Some of the folks here (turbo/kaos is one of them) rides their bikes on skinny tires. They say it reduces vibrations and makes their rides go faster.
And if you do go with wider tires you may have to change that fork anyway cause it looks pretty thin. Then there's the question if your fenders would still work.
Keep your bike pretty. Stick with those tires.
 
M

mickey

Guest
I have a picture of the front right here. I don't see an easy way to mount a caliper.
What does the front fender mount to? Could the caliper mount to the same hole?

EDIT: Large beat me to it. :D
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Messages
195
If I remember right,if you remove that fork and pop up that chrome cover you should see a mounting hole for brakes. Then drill thru the cover if you want to keep it.
I would leave the tires well enough alone. Just drop the pressure a little. It seems the regular pressure for a pedal bike according to what the tire says is overkill when you add a motor. If you keep the pressure as it states,you'll pop some tires. Drop it down about 5 psi.
Some of the folks here (turbo/kaos is one of them) rides their bikes on skinny tires. They say it reduces vibrations and makes their rides go faster.
And if you do go with wider tires you may have to change that fork anyway cause it looks pretty thin. Then there's the question if your fenders would still work.
Keep your bike pretty. Stick with those tires.
Thanks for easing my worried mind. I'll take a look under the cover and see what I can do regarding some caliper brakes. I don't have the bike near me, so I'll figure it out next time I'm near my bike.
 
T

turkeyssr

Guest
If you decide to replace the fork, try browsing bikepartsusa.com for a 700c fork that has cantilever studs and you can add a v-brake. (This assumes you don't care about the 'vintage' look). I added this type of fork to my Schwinn Traveler, and the stopping power is vastly improved. Also, if you went this route, you would likely have to get a new front wheel - 27" or 700c because the new fork is spaced 100mm and the old fork is something less than this. The difference between the 27" and 700c rim is only 4mm; well within the adjusting range of a v-brake.

Almost forgot....you should check to see if you have a true 1" stem or a 7/8" if you decide to swap the fork. You'll need a new headset to match the new fork and a true 1" stem. The stem you have is probably 7/8 (22.2mm) otherwise known as a BMX stem. Let me know if you have questions. It sounds costly, but you can get the parts fairly cheap and the advantage of a v-brake is well worth it - IMO.


--John
 

loquin

Active Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Messages
2,214
You could also put a drum brake hub on the front & respoke it.
 
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