First build

uhnonimaus

New Member
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Apr 6, 2024
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TBD, USA
Hello all, first time poster and first time builder. Ive never really had any mechanical teaching but i dont think that really matters today, but I've been reading around on here some and im hoping that if my goals are too unrealistic maybe you guys will set me straight. Ive got a huffy cranbrook, and a 100 cc china doll motor. Looking for advice on how i can get maximum mileage out of my bike/motor. Not overly concerned with going fast, Im planning to use it to travel on like a bike tour over the summer. Yes, I get that the bike will not be able to run the whole time, and no im not being unrealistic in thinking i can physically handle a bike tour. Im just trying to figure out how i can minimize the amount of work/tools ill have to carry with me during the bike tour. I know i could avoid all of that if i just biked alone, or just bought something prebuilt but Id prefer to learn something, and I'm strapped on cash like everyone else. I think though one of the biggest things i can do is replace the wheels with some magwheels. Ive seen some users recommend the ones off of bike berry and was thinking id go with those. I cant really tell the difference between the few different mags they have though, is there a spoke amount that is preferable or is it aesthetic? Also, the disc caliper bracket they have on bikeberry says its for the rear wheel so would i just be giving up the brakes on the front? Not that theres brakes on the front now as it is just would prefer if im doing the work to make it safer. Any other advice?
 
If I were light on cash and building a cranbrook (which I have done) I would stick with the stock wheels for a while. They are double wall steel with 10 gauge spokes, and overall aren't bad especially if you are a lighter weight rider. I would gut the coaster brake and go with some decent U rim brakes. (If you wanna go this route I can walk you through it). I would suggest an aluminum hub adapter instead of the rag joint (there is a proper way to install these to keep them from slipping and destroying your wheel. If you go this route we can walk you through it).

As far as getting miles out of your engine. Prep work and break in must be on point. Prep work includes washing the bottom end, loctiting all bolts with blue loctite, swapping the clutch pads for the black and white pads ( https://www.amazon.com/KQTshangmao-...&sprefix=motorized+bicycle+clu,aps,277&sr=8-4 ) and adjusting the clutch ( https://motoredbikes.com/posts/616861/ ) After that wash any metal flakes from the bottom end and assemble the top end. I prefer to use earless clips for the wrist pin, but that is not necessary. After assembly checking squish gap isn't a bad idea, but when shooting for reliability squish gap isn't as important as long as it isn't tight. I would start with a ngk BR6HS spark plug in place of the one that came with your kit.

Break in should be 20 to 1 mix ratio for the first 300 miles and a 32 to one ratio afterwards. Full conventional oil for the first 300 miles and semi or full synthetic after. Take it easy and avoid full throttle until after break in, and don't hold it at full throttle for long periods of time.
 
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When you say tour, how long and how far? I know you can cyclo-tour on any bike but typically steel bikes with efficient body positions and wide gear ranges are used.

If you want to stick with the cranbrook, you will want lower gearing on it, and rim brakes front and rear. Maybe a 2:1 (chainring to sprocket) on the pedal side and at least a 44 tooth on the engine side. Hub adapters will be easier on the wheels than the rag joint.

Coaster brakes can be okay under specific circumstances but I don't think coaster brakes are up to touring, especially not a single speed coaster brake.

You will obviously want racks on the front and rear, plenty of water and a large gas tank. Lights and mirrors too!
 
If I were light on cash and building a cranbrook (which I have done) I would stick with the stock wheels for a while. They are double wall steel with 10 gauge spokes, and overall aren't bad especially if you are a lighter weight rider. I would gut the coaster brake and go with some decent U rim brakes. (If you wanna go this route I can walk you through it). I would suggest an aluminum hub adapter instead of the rag joint (there is a proper way to install these to keep them from slipping and destroying your wheel. If you go this route we can walk you through it).

As far as getting miles out of your engine. Prep work and break in must be on point. Prep work includes washing the bottom end, loctiting all bolts with blue loctite, swapping the clutch pads for the black and white pads ( https://www.amazon.com/KQTshangmao-Clutch-Stroke-Motorized-Bicycle/dp/B09FL97LGR/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?crid=1GPKE681PIUKX&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.h2SRdPVCe5WOmPjqk_UF54XQ9ccN6Xp3bZpOtZw7djeFGdPjE1H0V2adxG6UccA6UFtJB0nobsACfcK_J42r2ZHW0JYZ3XFkkxf-eFKzLrYzyIDgltFlREX6ZyNTkfIB7Uwy5DjWiml2Pv2feSu-YhlJSpIcvysHe5QUBy8Yj5CaMe9zLL0kdBgm_FSARpEBe28s-1oALZ8Ac6uPd8Qy-A.13WeKLmxTut38d-K1Zw_i50NW6No_NDB-lKRVfR_68Y&dib_tag=se&keywords=motorized+bicycle+clutch+pads&qid=1712527839&sprefix=motorized+bicycle+clu,aps,277&sr=8-4 ) and adjusting the clutch ( https://motoredbikes.com/posts/616861/ ) After that wash any metal flakes from the bottom end and assemble the top end. I prefer to use earless clips for the wrist pin, but that is not necessary. After assembly checking squish gap isn't a bad idea, but when shooting for reliability squish gap isn't as important as long as it isn't tight. I would start with a ngk BR6HS spark plug in place of the one that came with your kit.

Break in should be 20 to 1 mix ratio for the first 300 miles and a 32 to one ratio afterwards. Full conventional oil for the first 300 miles and semi or full synthetic after. Take it easy and avoid full throttle until after break in, and don't hold it at full throttle for long periods of time.

Sorry, not that experienced with using forums and quoting specific parts of messages, but if yeah if you could walk me through replacing the coaster brakes that would be great. I have another bike, a giant st hybrid, with a shimano 7 speed on it and some new brakes. If those things would be preferable, i could just switch them over to the cranbrook right?


When you say tour, how long and how far? I know you can cyclo-tour on any bike but typically steel bikes with efficient body positions and wide gear ranges are used.

If you want to stick with the cranbrook, you will want lower gearing on it, and rim brakes front and rear. Maybe a 2:1 (chainring to sprocket) on the pedal side and at least a 44 tooth on the engine side. Hub adapters will be easier on the wheels than the rag joint.

Coaster brakes can be okay under specific circumstances but I don't think coaster brakes are up to touring, especially not a single speed coaster brake.

You will obviously want racks on the front and rear, plenty of water and a large gas tank. Lights and mirrors too!


Probably no more than 75 miles a day, and hoping to have everything figured out by May and touring until the election is over. I dont have front racks, but i have packs to hang off my handle bar and a rear rack. Any must have tools I'd need to keep on me?
 
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If I were light on cash and building a cranbrook (which I have done) I would stick with the stock wheels for a while. They are double wall steel with 10 gauge spokes, and overall aren't bad
Wait, what? Mine had single wall steel rims with 12 gauge spokes...they were crap and I weighed just under 150 lbs...

The front rim wobbled so bad I didn't even try to true it, I just replaced it with a husky mtb rim.
 
Wait, what? Mine had single wall steel rims with 12 gauge spokes...they were crap and I weighed just under 150 lbs...

The front rim wobbled so bad I didn't even try to true it, I just replaced it with a husky mtb rim.
Hmmm, maybe I'm thinking of something else. Mine are still decent after a full year of riding hard. My front wheel did develop a bit of a wobble, but all I had to do was tension one spoke and it pulled back straight.
 
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