Friction Drives - Staton, Inc.

Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Messages
495
Two important things on a friction drive set up. Make sure the drive roller is absolutely perpendicular (90 degrees) to the wheel/tire. Use tires with little or no tread, especially in the center where the roller contacts the tire. I found using very expensive tires is a waste of money. Because the tire flexes both when it contacts the road and then a great deal more when it is deflected under the roller, the tread will separate on the sides. Very cheap tires aren't worth the time and trouble of replacing them. Use a mid priced tire.
 


moondog

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Messages
191
Two important things on a friction drive set up. Make sure the drive roller is absolutely perpendicular (90 degrees) to the wheel/tire. Use tires with little or no tread, especially in the center where the roller contacts the tire. I found using very expensive tires is a waste of money. Because the tire flexes both when it contacts the road and then a great deal more when it is deflected under the roller, the tread will separate on the sides. Very cheap tires aren't worth the time and trouble of replacing them. Use a mid priced tire.
I am using these right now. Way thicker than a bicycle tire. It's the same size rim as a 20" bicycle rim.

http://www.bobscycle.com/browse.cfm/4,108356.html?AFF=690FGL
 
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