I give up: re-installing the cam and gear on the NE5

redneckracing674

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the size of the cam that goes into the fixed bearing. the precision ground shaft. it may be different, if it is a different/aftermarket cam.
 

Wrench

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wrong journal size. ill bet, if its a new cam

give it a good wiggle. my 3.5hp was a little tight, but tipping it cylender head down, and wiggling it, it went in.

the size of the cam that goes into the fixed bearing. the precision ground shaft. it may be different, if it is a different/aftermarket cam.
Risk Man is using an original Whizzer NE-5 cam
There are no aftermarket cams for the New Generation Whizzer

The only other cam that was made for the New Generation Whizzer is made by Cruzzer Motorbikes and their the same company that made the Whizzer Cam, But Cruzzer put the timing dot in the correct position

The Cruzzer cam can be identified by the Butterfly Logo on the cam gear
 

Risk Man

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Fifteen minutes tonight starting with TDC, I got it in with one tooth counterclockwise. Case side back on. Thanks for the tips and dialogue.

Trying to remove the flywheel next. I understand it is a clockwise remove, not reverse thread, but how do you hold it from turning without a special spanner tool to engage the three triangular holes on the face? knew I shouldn't but I did put rod into one of the three balancing holes on the rim and sure enough at the point of max torque, i chipped a small piece out of the balance holes. don't think it was enough to throw it off, but that is where my makeshift attempts stopped and back to the forums .......?
 

Wrench

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Fifteen minutes tonight starting with TDC, I got it in with one tooth counterclockwise. Case side back on. Thanks for the tips and dialogue.

Trying to remove the flywheel next. I understand it is a clockwise remove, not reverse thread, but how do you hold it from turning without a special spanner tool to engage the three triangular holes on the face? knew I shouldn't but I did put rod into one of the three balancing holes on the rim and sure enough at the point of max torque, i chipped a small piece out of the balance holes. don't think it was enough to throw it off, but that is where my makeshift attempts stopped and back to the forums .......?

There should be a balance hole by the strike plate.
I use a socket screwdriver that fits in the hole nicely.
DSCF8425.JPG

I use the belt guard mounting hole/tower to hold the tool & flywheel while loosening the flywheel bolt.
I use the same technique when tightening the flywheel bolt
but of course the tool will be resting on the top belt guard hole/tower

Note: when using this technique by resting a tool on the belt guard mounting hole/tower don't tighten the flywheel bolt crazy tight or else ya might snap off the case belt guard mounting hole/tower
No need loctite, put antiseize on the flywheel bolt
DSCF8427.JPG

Your gonna need a 3 jaw puller to get the flywheel off
DSCF8424.JPG
 

Risk Man

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Hummm... I had three holes in a row with thin space between. Grabbed the trailing one with an allen wrench that fit But holding it at the crook did not give me enough leverage but chipped out one of the spaces between the holes like a gouge. Your method should resolve that if I use the leading hole as the leverage will be against the solid wall of the hole. think I have a puller, but like many of my rarely used tools, need to remember where it is, Thanks
 

Wrench

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I tried it but I put it back in the original position. Bike runs fine with the strike plate in the original position, @17*

Some people think advancing the strike plate to 23* is gonna make a world of difference but it don't on these bikes

Maybe if ya got a engine that will go 60+ mph it will help but it's not necessary on an almost stock engine

My engine is basically almost stock and goes 50mph with the strike plate @ 17* and moving it to 23* didn't make a diff

It's an issue some will argue about

11:50 pm EDIT: This post was a reply to Risk Man, he asked me a question about the Strike Plate IDK why he delete his post
 

Chainlube

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I tried it but I put it back in the original position. Bike runs fine with the strike plate in the original position, @17*

Some people think advancing the strike plate to 23* is gonna make a world of difference but it don't on these bikes

Maybe if ya got a engine that will go 60+ mph it will help but it's not necessary on an almost stock engine

My engine is basically almost stock and goes 50mph with the strike plate @ 17* and moving it to 23* didn't make a diff

It's an issue some will argue about
Live interact is better than idle talk.
 

Wrench

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17* is the min and 23* is the max

This means the engine is gonna run fine if the strike plate is within these specs

I never put a degree wheel on the flywheel to check

It's said, when moving the strike plate to 23* move it counterclockwise until the rear of the plate covers 1/2 the original screw hole
Then drill and tap a new screw hole for the strike plate

In this pic you can the hole I drilled for moving the plate to 23*
Well you can see 1/2 a hole because the plate is covering the other 1/2
DSCF8434.JPG
 
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