Motorized bike build

Greggl432

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I'm looking to get into motorized bikes. I'm wanting to go with the Hyper Cruiser and an Engine kit. The differences between the $200 dollar kits and the $89 dollar engine kits are not apparent, so I will probably go with the more inexpensive kit. Also, I lack knowledge of how to add brakes, calipers and the like, so I will try to keep my modifications/upgrades to a minimum. Does anyone have advice as to which additional parts would be suggested? Is the 100cc kit the same as the 80cc kit, and would the 80cc kit be lighter or provide less strain on the spokes than the 100cc kit? Will both kits fit? And lastly, do I need to shop for hardware that one would likely wan't to upgrade? Such as the chain tensioner? I've heard bad things about the stock chain tensioners

I previously posted on this and felt like my thread was being hijacked, and the answers too my questions were getting harder and harder to find.

I'm looking to do a simple budget build, to get started, and go from there. So this bike will likely utilize a coaster brake, stock wheels, and a potentially cheaper engine kit to provide a base that I can then upgrade. Previously, people said that this would be unsafe. However, I find it hard knowing what I need without the parts in front of me and a base to build off of. Additionally, it doesn't seem wise to be buying kits and parts if I don't know how they will be beneficial. So I'm going to get a bike firstly.

Could I take a bike to a shop before it has an engine added so they could do some upgrades to make it a better motorized bike when I get the engine installed? Things like brakes come to mind. Someone previously mentioned tires and I was unsure if those were a necessity, or if the stock hyper cruiser tires would suffice.

They additionally posted some sort of a sprocket hub adapter thingy, and I was unsure if that was going to be an additional sprocket, or, if it too was a necessity.

Money will become available to me if I sign up for general relief. With this money I think it would be wise to put together a budget commuter capable of getting me 20 miles while weighing 350lbs.

Sorry for deleting my threads, I am really wanting a commuter and hope people can understand that I don't want to drive in and buy a $200 dollar engine kit when I see them for $89 dollars with no discernable difference. Plan on getting a bike and then an engine kit as a base and then going from there. I don't see anything wrong with that idea.




Thanks for the help, once more.
 
capable of getting me 20 miles while weighing 350lbs.

Sorry for deleting my threads, I am really wanting a commuter and hope people can understand that I don't want to drive in and buy a $200 dollar engine kit when I see them for $89 dollars with no discernable difference. Plan on getting a bike and then an engine kit as a base and then going from there. I don't see anything wrong with that idea.




Thanks for the help, once more.
Good Luck
 
A cheap kit is like rolling the dice. You may get a good one straight out of the box but not likely. So unless you have the skills to tear the engine down and fix it, cheapping out will probably cost you more than buying quality to begin with. The majority of the time, sites selling engines at a ridiculously low price is a scam. Yes, you'll eventually get your money back but it will be several weeks latter.

Have you ever taken a bicycle to a reputable bicycle shop for repairs? Their labor and parts cost can exceed what you purchased a new department store bicycle for. This is why we teach others how to do their own work.

Since you're a large person concentrate on building a safe pedal only bicycle first. Once you have a bike with wheels to support your weight and at least front/rear rim brakes with Kool Stop pads; then start saving up money for a quality engine. Though for you I strongly recommend front/rear disc brakes with Kool Stop ebike pads be installed.
 
I'm looking to get into motorized bikes. I'm wanting to go with the Hyper Cruiser and an Engine kit.
All of these questions of yours have already been answered whilst members were also telling you why what your trying to do in the cheapest way possible with an unrealistic budget in order to have a halfway reliable bike just will not work out for you because of particular issues involved with safety due to weight issues that effect the bicycle structure, wheels, tires, and tubes rated to only 250 pounds gross weight limits, as well as coaster brakes for stopping that are dangerous even for an average weight person as they ALWAYS overheat and fail, especially in an emergency stop.

I sincerly doubt that anyone is going to waste anymore of their time and effort and be caught into the trap of answering your same questions over and over and over again, only to have the entire threads deleted by you AGAIN for what will now be the third time you will have done so because experienced builders are not giving you the answers that YOU want to hear.

These guys are too nice to tell you this bluntly, I am not that nice so I am telling you the truth very bluntly.
 
If you are on a budget that is understandable. If you aren't going really fast brakes don't have to be full disc. However brakes are still important. A coaster brake is not bad for a secondary brake, but I believe front brakes are a good option.

The only weakness of the hyper is the factory wheels and brakes. I upgraded mine to full disc brake and heavy duty wheels, but I am also building it with a phantom 85. The factory hyper wheels are pretty weak. Even if you could find some huffy cranbrook or nel lusso wheels those would be sturdier.

 You could have a bike shop relace your wheels with better and thicker spokes. They will then true and tension the spokes for you. That may or may not be cheaper than an alternative option.

If you can find a decent mountain bike with front forks that would seap over for cheap that would give you a sturdier set of wheels to work with and a front brake. A rear brake isn't too hard to add either if you order this type of caliper. A cheap set will cost 20ish dollars and work good enough. Ine thing I found with these is they eat up pads and need constant adjustment. They however make a bike much safer.

Good luck with your build! I look forward to seeing what you come up with!
 
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Bike shops will understandably not touch gas builds or diy ebikes. However they will work on established ebikes. Aventon is a real business with connections to almost every bike shop, not a fly by night drop shipper. https://www.aventon.com/collections/ebikes-for-400lb-person

If you get the front brake upgrade it will be all there and mostly put together. Just handle bars and wheels to bolt on.
I also recommend the solid seat post and smaller chainring.

350 lbs is a lot. I don't trust a rag joint to handle the torque you need to get up hills. Again I will link the 3 bolt sportsman hub adapter. You must use a 56 tooth sprocket. I'm not the 66cc kits have enough torque compared to the yd100 engines like that zeda 100.

There are cheaper 2 bolt hub adapters but those don't clamp as well. Not usually a problem, until you have to put in enough torque to get up californian hills with a 400+ pound system. https://sportsmanflyer.com/shop/parts/sportsman-heavy-duty-sprocket-adapter/
 
Huffy Cranbrook Commuter

Here are some notes I've gathered:

1) Add a front brake - What kind of kit do I need for the Huffy Cranbrook?
2) Upgrade the chain tensioner - Thoughts on this?
3) With the chain tensioner, put it on crank side and engrave cross hatching pattern - Which side is the crank side?
4) A rear sprocket adapter - Which sprocket adapter for the Huffy Cranbrook?
5) use old inner tubes between the frame and the engine
6) Remove the fenders

Tools to have:
1. Allen key set metric.
2. adjustable wrenches 8" handles are a good sweet spot. - Metric and non metric?
3. brake cleaner and grease (try to get lithium grease. but any will do) - can the brake cleaner be skipped?
4. chain oil. - recommendations?
5. 2 stroke oil - Is there a recommended 2 stroke oil
6) Fix a flat?
7) Is a drill a necessity?
 
If you are on a budget that is understandable. If you aren't going really fast brakes don't have to be full disc. However brakes are still important. A coaster brake is not bad for a secondary brake, but I believe front brakes are a good option.

The only weakness of the hyper is the factory wheels and brakes. I upgraded mine to full disc brake and heavy duty wheels, but I am also building it with a phantom 85. The factory hyper wheels are pretty weak. Even if you could find some huffy cranbrook or nel lusso wheels those would be sturdier.

 You could have a bike shop relace your wheels with better and thicker spokes. They will then true and tension the spokes for you. That may or may not be cheaper than an alternative option.

If you can find a decent mountain bike with front forks that would seap over for cheap that would give you a sturdier set of wheels to work with and a front brake. A rear brake isn't too hard to add either if you order this type of caliper. A cheap set will cost 20ish dollars and work good enough. Ine thing I found with these is they eat up pads and need constant adjustment. They however make a bike much safer.

Good luck with your build! I look forward to seeing what you come up with!
Most reputable bicycle shops don't really like wheel building because it's very time consuming. Truing a wheel is still a matter of trail and error on the truing stand. You're constantly making adjustments until you have very little horizontal and vertical movement in the rim. Around 15 years ago I had a bike shop build a wheel for me the parts was less than the labor. Hub, rim, spoke, and nipples $85, labor $120. That was for just one wheel.

After that I got the necessary equipment and learned how to build my own wheels. At the OP weight if there's any steep hills around disc brakes are a must when braking coming down them.
 
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Which sprocket adapter do I need? I don't know my chain size, but will be using this kit. I wan't to have a 44t sprocket and am using the Huffy Cranbrook.


Thanks!
 

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I keep linking machine built heavy duty wheels and OP keeps deleting the threads over topic drift. :)

These are fair priced for the components, cant build them cheaper yourself to the same spec. https://www.huskybicycles.com/bicycle-wheel-26-x-2125-front-11-g-spokes-cp.html

With the hills you've got in Cali, it would be suicide to go without a solid front brake. The XL drum brake is used on heavily loaded cargo bikes and tandems. I have one, and have a disc brake bike and cannot recommend these sturmey archer brakes enough for any bike. A joy to set up and very low maintenance.


And a rear wheel: the shimano is the best coaster brake you can get. People put them in whizzers and worksman specs them on their bullet proof wheels. https://www.huskybicycles.com/bicycle-wheel-26-x-2125-rear-coaster-brake-11g-steel.html
 
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