72V 3000W Cyclone Electric and Gas Generator Build (SBP kit) - Three Phase Dev

bakaneko

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Nov 16, 2015
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1,319
Hello. It is time for me to build my "ultimate, final form" motorized bike. It will hopefully be a electric mid drive bike with a small, removable dc gas generator on the rear rack. The bike should be capable of doing 40mph+ and cruise easily in upper 20s and with only the battery (2 kwH) do 30-40 miles at cruise (no wind, no elevation). With the gas generator, I am not sure on the range it will depend on the engine that I can get and if it all works out but I am hoping for some impressive stats with minimum noise (high idle rev). I decided to go this route instead of a 79cc+ motor because I really like the near instant torque, efficiency, and low noise of electric motors, but I am also realistic about the range hence the gas generator. This model is currently being used in most modern locomotives and cruise ships due to power efficiency curves.

I will be using a Walmart Huffy Nighthawk bike that currently has a 500W rear hub motor. I tried to sell this before starting the new build but no serious bids this late into the season so I will just use it. The batteries will be hoverboard/scooter 36V 4.4aH batteries hooked up in parallel then series for 72V. I will be doing this in 3 phases to properly test everything and not overwhelm myself. It should probably take me into spring to get everything correct.

Phase 1 - Upgrading to the 72V 3000W Cyclone SBP mid drive kit from 36V 500W hub drive
Phase 2 - Adding max batteries from 1.2 kwH to 2 kwH and adding wind break fairings and clear pocket bike wind shield
Phase 3 - Adding the 25-49cc gas generator (200-600W) output to the rear rack

Here is the design. Battery1 and B2 are already on the bike. Originally, I did not know where a third battery pack can go but after watching some YouTube videos of big power DYI ebike riders they make a right and left battery compartment (B3) near the stem of the bike to house the batteries. I was gonna put it under the downtube... B3 will allow me to put in a wind fairing too and with a windshield. I should be able to tuck under this to get real aerodynamic? The added weight of B3 should also help prevent the bike from undesired wheelies. All the batteries are removable with simple nuts and bolts for winter and storage. Let me know if there is any concerns with this design. Pic of current bike too.

Also, this will be a minimal cost build. Not that I am gonna cheap out on absolutely necessary items but it wont be top of the line components and do a lot of DYI. I will do a thorough documentation of this build and thought analysis. The hybrid concept is cool. I know some electric bike guys would never go gas generator and mebe some gas heads here scoof at the range of ebikes, but hopefully this hybrid will be both extremely gas and pollution efficient and also have an incredible 2-3x range of current ebikes. And, the generator is optional and can be easily removed with a few nuts and bolts.
 

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bakaneko

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So, trying to do minimal cost... I think with this wiring diagram one for charging and one for riding. I only need minimal connectors. Let me know if there are any concerns. My only thought is one battery wiring is going to be considerably longer than the other...

With this wiring, I wont need to replace my watt meter (only up to 60V) or charger since it is still at 36V. I will just double the power reading and the aH used will be halfed or wait is it actual. Okay, I think it is actual (16 aH). I will just need 3 new connectors to make it work below.

1. XT60 Male to XT90 Female (2x)
2. XT90 series connector 2 Male to 1 Female

This way I don't have to disconnect my current watt meter and a majority of the wiring of the 500W bike. But, yeah, I will test with multimeter.
 

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junglepig

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Joined
Oct 30, 2018
Messages
218
Hello. It is time for me to build my "ultimate, final form" motorized bike. It will hopefully be a electric mid drive bike with a small, removable dc gas generator on the rear rack. The bike should be capable of doing 40mph+ and cruise easily in upper 20s and with only the battery (2 kwH) do 30-40 miles at cruise (no wind, no elevation). With the gas generator, I am not sure on the range it will depend on the engine that I can get and if it all works out but I am hoping for some impressive stats with minimum noise (high idle rev). I decided to go this route instead of a 79cc+ motor because I really like the near instant torque, efficiency, and low noise of electric motors, but I am also realistic about the range hence the gas generator. This model is currently being used in most modern locomotives and cruise ships due to power efficiency curves.

I will be using a Walmart Huffy Nighthawk bike that currently has a 500W rear hub motor. I tried to sell this before starting the new build but no serious bids this late into the season so I will just use it. The batteries will be hoverboard/scooter 36V 4.4aH batteries hooked up in parallel then series for 72V. I will be doing this in 3 phases to properly test everything and not overwhelm myself. It should probably take me into spring to get everything correct.

Phase 1 - Upgrading to the 72V 3000W Cyclone SBP mid drive kit from 36V 500W hub drive
Phase 2 - Adding max batteries from 1.2 kwH to 2 kwH and adding wind break fairings and clear pocket bike wind shield
Phase 3 - Adding the 25-49cc gas generator (200-600W) output to the rear rack

Here is the design. Battery1 and B2 are already on the bike. Originally, I did not know where a third battery pack can go but after watching some YouTube videos of big power DYI ebike riders they make a right and left battery compartment (B3) near the stem of the bike to house the batteries. I was gonna put it under the downtube... B3 will allow me to put in a wind fairing too and with a windshield. I should be able to tuck under this to get real aerodynamic? The added weight of B3 should also help prevent the bike from undesired wheelies. All the batteries are removable with simple nuts and bolts for winter and storage. Let me know if there is any concerns with this design. Pic of current bike too.

Also, this will be a minimal cost build. Not that I am gonna cheap out on absolutely necessary items but it wont be top of the line components and do a lot of DYI. I will do a thorough documentation of this build and thought analysis. The hybrid concept is cool. I know some electric bike guys would never go gas generator and mebe some gas heads here scoof at the range of ebikes, but hopefully this hybrid will be both extremely gas and pollution efficient and also have an incredible 2-3x range of current ebikes. And, the generator is optional and can be easily removed with a few nuts and bolts.
 

bakaneko

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Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
1,319
Thanks guys. I'll thoroughly update this thread but not to the point of obsessive compulsion. I'll take a look at that material CrazyDan. I am not the first to do this but I will document it really well here and when finish compare it with 2-stroke, 4-stroke, and electric bikes to see the exact price to reliability and performance. Here I am using an expensive 3000w motor but you can find cheap 500-1000W hub motors for $120-170 and tag on a buffer battery for $100 and then a gas-generator for $200-300. And, it might come out to around $500 (less a bike). Is this based on reliability and performance (speed & range) better than the other options? We'll see...
 

bakaneko

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Nov 16, 2015
Messages
1,319
Yes, I've seen these. But, it is actually very large for a rear rack. And, the 600W output is AC and DC is usually like 100W. The DC generator I am planning to make is going to be much smaller where it is hardly noticeable on the rear rack. I feel these AC/DC generators will make the bike stand out too much and be top heavy. Also, there is an unnecessary conversion to AC there. There was a 500W one of these that was very small from Power Generators or something but it is not made anymore and impossible to find.

But that does bring up a good point. The actual DC generator cost needs to be around this generator plus a fast charger = $150 + $75 = $225

That Lifan generator will look something like this. I think its a bit too tall. I want mine to be about 1/2 that height at the end.

 
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