Please help!! 4 stroke centrifugal clutch

Sorry I somehow missed your thread last month Christina. I have the exact same motor and transmission as yours.
Just finished reading all of the 6 pages here and see that you still have not made any real decisions. You must be overwhelmed. I know I was after doing countless hours of online research on this subject. I am building a second bike and for a short time considered torq converters also. You have probably come to see that this change involves a lot of parts and might become rather costly. That being said..........in post #21 Pete asked, what was wrong with the original clutch that made you deside to change? In post #31 Jerry points out the need to add a jackshft. All of us
4 stroke riders stick together and and have figured out how to reliably make a stock clutch work with no problems. The one and only drawback is that the clutch bell is not available. No problem getting the clutch mechanism itself and @Deleted Member 4613 has figured out how to make the bushing issue bullet proof. So, if you still have the orginal clutch bell the fastest and least expensive way to get back on the road would be fix what you've got.

I foolishly deleted all the info I had compiled regarding torq converters last month when deciding to just use a jackshaft. Your motor has a jackshaft. The large sprocket on your belt is connected to it. Converting to a torq converter will necessatate changing the sprocket on your wheel and most likely designing a new jackshaft assy. on your seat post. I apologize Christina if you already know all of this.

Now regarding the drive shaft on your motor. It is 15mm (0.595) straight shaft. This is 0.030 less than 5/8 of an inch. This motor also has a tappered shaft version and you do not want to get them confused because the clutches are not interchangable.
In the post above Nirve has presented the solution to your problem.
K&S Precision Metals, stock no. 9415 is a similar aluminum tube that will shim the shaft to an actual 5/8inch allowing the use of a standard go-kart 5/8 inch clutch. Also available on Amazon for about $16.

If you go forward with this I strongly recommend using a MAX TORQ clutch. Reason is, it's the only one that allows you to change the internal springs. They offer a package of different springs which in turn will allow you to change at what RPM the clutch engages. You really won't know what you need till you ride it and if you bought a generic clutch you're stuck with it. Last time I looked everyone is SOLD OUT. The prices only differ by a couple of dollars between sellers so grab one as soon as you see it.

In the event you give up on the torq converter idea, like I did , take a look at my thread hiding on page 3 in GENERAL DISCUSSION. This is the easiest and most cost effective jackshaft assembly that you could use. You buy all the pieces seperately which gives you an unlimited choice and I will be more than glad to help you choose them if need be. PM me if you have specific question anytime. Best wishes going forward. Don't get discouraged. We're all here to help. m
 
Sorry I somehow missed your thread last month Christina. I have the exact same motor and transmission as yours.
Just finished reading all of the 6 pages here and see that you still have not made any real decisions. You must be overwhelmed. I know I was after doing countless hours of online research on this subject. I am building a second bike and for a short time considered torq converters also. You have probably come to see that this change involves a lot of parts and might become rather costly. That being said..........in post #21 Pete asked, what was wrong with the original clutch that made you deside to change? In post #31 Jerry points out the need to add a jackshft. All of us
4 stroke riders stick together and and have figured out how to reliably make a stock clutch work with no problems. The one and only drawback is that the clutch bell is not available. No problem getting the clutch mechanism itself and @Deleted Member 4613 has figured out how to make the bushing issue bullet proof. So, if you still have the orginal clutch bell the fastest and least expensive way to get back on the road would be fix what you've got.

I foolishly deleted all the info I had compiled regarding torq converters last month when deciding to just use a jackshaft. Your motor has a jackshaft. The large sprocket on your belt is connected to it. Converting to a torq converter will necessatate changing the sprocket on your wheel and most likely designing a new jackshaft assy. on your seat post. I apologize Christina if you already know all of this.

Now regarding the drive shaft on your motor. It is 15mm (0.595) straight shaft. This is 0.030 less than 5/8 of an inch. This motor also has a tappered shaft version and you do not want to get them confused because the clutches are not interchangable.
In the post above Nirve has presented the solution to your problem.
K&S Precision Metals, stock no. 9415 is a similar aluminum tube that will shim the shaft to an actual 5/8inch allowing the use of a standard go-kart 5/8 inch clutch. Also available on Amazon for about $16.

If you go forward with this I strongly recommend using a MAX TORQ clutch. Reason is, it's the only one that allows you to change the internal springs. They offer a package of different springs which in turn will allow you to change at what RPM the clutch engages. You really won't know what you need till you ride it and if you bought a generic clutch you're stuck with it. Last time I looked everyone is SOLD OUT. The prices only differ by a couple of dollars between sellers so grab one as soon as you see it.

In the event you give up on the torq converter idea, like I did , take a look at my thread hiding on page 3 in GENERAL DISCUSSION. This is the easiest and most cost effective jackshaft assembly that you could use. You buy all the pieces seperately which gives you an unlimited choice and I will be more than glad to help you choose them if need be. PM me if you have specific question anytime. Best wishes going forward. Don't get discouraged. We're all here to help. m
Thanks, that's a great bit of experience and info there.
 
So, I've found an adapter that is 15mm to 5/8 because 5/8 is actually a bit bigger than 15mm. So I'm going to get the adapter and I'm really having trouble finding an actual clutch for the belt drive I have. Mine is like a cog where the belt goes, it's not like any of these v shaped belts im finding. If I can find a clutch then I'll go that route but was really hoping to get a torque converter. It's crazy how I've taught myself all of this stuff and have learned so much in the process! Lol
 
This is what I found as far as an adapter
 

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I just have to measure the length of the shaft to make sure it's 2mm. I don't have any way to cut it down so I need an exact size. The guy that built the bike thinks that a 30 series torque converter will work, hopefully if I get the adapter it will. I just don't know which one I need to get and will it simply line up with the set up I have now? If I just remove the clutch, belt, and wheel? that's my biggest worry!
 
Hi Christina. Looks like you're working on your bike once again, but still have not made up your mind which way to go. I just reread all 7 pages to remember what your initial complaint was and this is what I found.............the clutch is ok but I'm constantly having to lubricate the bushing what seems like an awful lot. So I assume you still have all the original pieces. I hope you have reread all my post #61.

The sleve adapter you are showing will work just fine. Don't order it until you make up your mind. I'm sure you can find someone with a hacksaw that will cut it to the correct length.

Constantly lubing the original bushing is just part of deal for all of us with a belt drive. Most of us have converted over to an Oillite bushing or ball bearings to eliminate this. This would be, in my opinion, the best way to go. You strike me as someone who just wants to enjoy their bike and not a "hot rodder", seeing as you are worried about cutting down that sleve. This is the fastest, least expensive way to fix your concerns.

Like I said, I talked myself out of a torque converter with the excellent explanations from all the members here. Here's why. Your present trany has a 5:1 drive ratio, a T.C. has (aprox.) a 1:1 to 3:1 ratio. After consulting a speed chart you will see that you will most likely be replacing the 44T sprocket along with the chain, and possibly, possibly adding a jack shaft assembly. A lot more work and expense, but if you really want a TC we can help you find a good one. Having never ridden one, I believe they engage more smoothly and you don't have to oil them. To me, these are small advantages compared to what I stated above.

The only downside to what you have now is that the clutch bell ( the outside with the cogs) is not a replacement part. The clutch itself on the inside is replacable when the shoes wear out. Let us know which way you want to go and we'll all help you. BTW........congrats on winning the Super Bowl. It's a shame about the parade though. Just a sign of the times.
 
Hi Christina. Looks like you're working on your bike once again, but still have not made up your mind which way to go. I just reread all 7 pages to remember what your initial complaint was and this is what I found.............the clutch is ok but I'm constantly having to lubricate the bushing what seems like an awful lot. So I assume you still have all the original pieces. I hope you have reread all my post #61.

The sleve adapter you are showing will work just fine. Don't order it until you make up your mind. I'm sure you can find someone with a hacksaw that will cut it to the correct length.

Constantly lubing the original bushing is just part of deal for all of us with a belt drive. Most of us have converted over to an Oillite bushing or ball bearings to eliminate this. This would be, in my opinion, the best way to go. You strike me as someone who just wants to enjoy their bike and not a "hot rodder", seeing as you are worried about cutting down that sleve. This is the fastest, least expensive way to fix your concerns.

Like I said, I talked myself out of a torque converter with the excellent explanations from all the members here. Here's why. Your present trany has a 5:1 drive ratio, a T.C. has (aprox.) a 1:1 to 3:1 ratio. After consulting a speed chart you will see that you will most likely be replacing the 44T sprocket along with the chain, and possibly, possibly adding a jack shaft assembly. A lot more work and expense, but if you really want a TC we can help you find a good one. Having never ridden one, I believe they engage more smoothly and you don't have to oil them. To me, these are small advantages compared to what I stated above.

The only downside to what you have now is that the clutch bell ( the outside with the cogs) is not a replacement part. The clutch itself on the inside is replacable when the shoes wear out. Let us know which way you want to go and we'll all help you. BTW........congrats on winning the Super Bowl. It's a shame about the parade though. Just a sign of the times.
That's awesome and thank you so much for taking the time to reply! That is so cool! Anyways if there is a cheaper way for me to go then I'm all for that! What kind of bushing am I going to need? Also, I do want to get a new clutch drum at least if that's possible. I just don't know what to get and where. Let me know if you have any ideas and also what kind of bushing or ball bearing an I needing? Where do I get it?
 
Need your help. Do any of you know where this clucth can be purchased seperate from the kit? I know the internal part is offered, but we're looking for the clutch bell itself with the cogged pulley. Thanks in advance.

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