Are bike with more speeds better or with single speed?

LewieBike

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May 21, 2014
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My 3 speed J.C. Higgins was chosen because it's easily converted to an indexed gear 5 speed. It's also a true "V" frame lugged bike that these engines were made for. With a 44 tooth front sprocket and 28X14 rear cluster I have enough gear range to cover most situations including assisting the engine on steepish hills. It also pedals fairly easily if I run out of gas, although I think steeper hills would be a slog without engine assist.
 

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LR Jerry

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Mar 14, 2011
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This part you said!By using a multi geared bike you can run a much larger rear sprocket than what comes with the kit. Meaning you'll get higher top end speeds. WTF are you talking about? I use a 7spd 11-34 free wheel and have for years,and with a 44t chain ring on the 11t I can't even get close to keeping up to or helping the engine after 1/4 throttle it's all no load fake peddaling.
My bad here I said larger rear sprocket and meant smaller. For a higher top end speed. Went back and corrected that. Thanks
 

JerboaJohn

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Jul 29, 2018
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the thing I hate most is under pedal power, you feel every ounce of the engine chain and without freewheel, it does make some noise just rolling. I want to try getting a #35 drive gear and sprocket to help with that. or if I run into some bucks, belt drive
 

The_Aleman

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May 2, 2007
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I think a #35 chain would make more noise than 410/710 (more pins per gear inch), but it does allow you to fine-tune ratios and run slightly smaller sprockets. Saved me 3" of sprocket diameter in the case of my 76T crank sprocket!
 

LR Jerry

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It kinda threw me too with the equating larger rear with higher top end. Now I get where you were trying to go with it.
My bad there pre coffee answer I meant smaller rear sprocket for a higher gear ratio.
 

Steve Best

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I think a #35 chain would make more noise than 410/710 (more pins per gear inch), but it does allow you to fine-tune ratios and run slightly smaller sprockets. Saved me 3" of sprocket diameter in the case of my 76T crank sprocket!
I didn't try #35.
I had best luck with bicycle chain all 'round on the shifter as well as the single speed bikes. It is available in high quality light chain at a reasonable cost, it has ample strength and runs quiet and low friction due to the quality construction.

The kit chain I received was garbage. Uneven pitch and stiff bound up links.
 

FurryOnTheInside

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Sep 23, 2013
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A bicycle chain is certainly a lot cheaper than an equivalent quality moped chain to replace the kit :poop: chain. You can replace your chain more frequently for less cost, have a spare chain before you actually need it..
A 1/8" #410 bicycle chain is also a lot lighter than 3/16" #415 moped chain. I feel like I should have weighed the kit chain and the one I used to make the point that it's a lottt lighter. It's certainly easier to control a lighter chain.

I definitely feel and hear less noise riding over bumps with a lighter chain, but I didn't try the kit chain at all. I started with KMC #410 1/8" single speed chain and then changed to KMC 11/128" 9 speed chain.
The difference between the horrible quality ultra heavy 3/16" chain and a KMC 1/8" chain would be greater of course.

They all still need to be part of a solid bike build though. And you may have to grind your sprockets narrower to run a narrower chain.
Multi speed chains do need more help with the lateral flex than 1/8" or 3/32" single speed. You feel it less but it would wiggle more, if you allow it.
 
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