Alternative Tensioner Methods

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DAMIEN1307

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Would it work to run the chain under the tensioner pully?
I also just noticed that you seem to have plenty of travel distance left in your drop outs to just simply loosen the wheel and move it back a little more to take up some extra slack.
 

ImpulseRocket89

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Just to put my 2 cents in. The function of a chain tensioner is to add a pre-set amount of tension to the slack side of a chain (non-driven, or bottom in a bikes case). That pre-set amount of tension is there to control the chain movement to help prevent it from whipping off the sprockets as well as reduce excessive lash to reduce wear.

The driven (top) is automatically tensioned when under load. Adding a tensioner here isn't necessarily harmful to the chain, but the tensioner wheel is going to be under a ton of load and will likely fail sooner. What it can do is add extra strain on the links and roller shafts at the link joints. By lifting the chain off the rear you are also reducing engagement, which increases load over the remaining rollers.

One thing a tensioner does not do is ensure alignment. If you are relying on a tensioner to keep a chain aligned, you are going to wear out sprockets and chains much faster.
 
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Just to put my 2 cents in. The function of a chain tensioner is to add a pre-set amount of tension to the slack side of a chain (non-driven, or bottom in a bikes case). That pre-set amount of tension is there to control the chain movement to help prevent it from whipping off the sprockets as well as reduce excessive lash to reduce wear.

The driven (top) is automatically tensioned when under load. Adding a tensioner here isn't necessarily harmful to the chain, but the tensioner wheel is going to be under a ton of load and will likely fail sooner. What it can do is add extra strain on the links and roller shafts at the link joints. By lifting the chain off the rear you are also reducing engagement, which increases load over the remaining rollers.

One thing a tensioner does not do is ensure alignment. If you are relying on a tensioner to keep a chain aligned, you are going to wear out sprockets and chains much faster.
For those interested, as I am someone with actual hands on experience with this product..it works well, with minimal tension on the top wheel.

The bottom tension wheel is doing as it should, adding tension. the top tension wheel is holding the top chain in place, feeding it into the motor at an optimal angle, without any noticeable extreme pressure on the top wheel... certainly less tension on the top than bottom, and not a cause of concern.

Edit: actual hands on with this product, you would realise the bottom wheel is not pulled up as tight as it normally would be. Therefore the top is not tense as it would be, allowing it to adjust over the top wheel as needed. Your assumptions are based on how this system normally works with one wheel.

I dont have the bottom tensioner overly tight to begin with... there is some small amount of slack overall which allows the chain to rotate smoothly without too much tension, but of course not too much slack to jump the wheel.

After roughly 30 miles of riding, it is the smoothest tensioner setup I've had thus far, and would recommend a try to those with similar issues. I dont think they would be selling kits with this method if it didn't offer some benefit....but if it fails in the future, I will return and update. 👍
 

FrizzleFried

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certainly less tension on the top than bottom, and not a cause of concern.

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My observation for those interested...and not just here to add doubt and nonsense to the conversation:

upon installation I had the tension rather tight all around, but as I rode a few miles, the tension relaxed a little. Now, it feels like the wheels naturally settled into place where there is just enough slack all around for smooth operation, and no cause for concern with over tension on any of the tension wheels...which SPIN WITH the chain, by the way...and no concern of the chain jumping off. 👍
 

Street Ryderz

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Since I started riding motorbikes, I've had to experiment with different chain tensioners. I wont go into much detail, but my bike has an abnormally large frame for a 26" bike, and the rear frame holding the rear wheel, flairs out wider than usual.

Because of this, the drive chain cant be cut to a perfect size to work proper without a tensioner, and the standard tensioner wont work on this frame. Even the aftermarket tensioner with the spring didn't work well. I needed an alternative tensioner method.

I finally found a nice alternative on Amazon (see pic 1). This tensioner (around $30) is a bracket that is supported at the bottom and rear of the frame. The kit came with a single wheel which can be moved higher or lower as needed, and the whole bracket can be bent a little to find the perfect angle. I really like this style tensioner and had been riding this for a while.

The only thing I didnt like was the top of the chain (being fed into the engine) would angle pretty low and close to the bottom of the chain, potentially rubbing together with the top of the wheel, if the chain isn't held tight enough by the tensioner.

To fix this I found another 2-wheel tensioner method, which I now use and works great (pic2).

This method is using two wheels on the bracket...the top wheel feeds the chain into the engine at the perfect angle, and the bottom wheel holds the chain tight.

I also found they have kits with this 2-wheel method for sale, around the same price. Just thought I would post this for any with tensioner problems 👍
Veterans feel free to comment with any suggestions.
I'm sorry but that's the sketchiest crap I've seen in awhile! That is completely unnecessary, and I can clearly see the upper chain line is cutting into the seat stay, no tensioner would be a better setup for this frame type as I've done it many times.
 

Cisco

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I know people hate them
Ya, I wasn't too keen on it, but I haven't had any problems. Too much slack without taking out a link, but not enough slack to take out a full link. I really like the crescent tensioner. I would like to find a neoprene roller that would fit.
 
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