Take it easy in the corners.

cloakedvillain

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About three weeks or so I was riding a non motorized bicycle and I lost traction in a tight turn. Now mind you the road was wet and sandy and I was going a little above 30mph (if the bike computer is to be believed) but a tumble hurts all the same regardless of the road conditions. Twisted my derailleur hanger, bent the derailleur, scuffed the frame, handle bars swung around and bashed the mirror against my knuckles not to mention the damage I sustained.

Tore a hole in my jeans, skinned my knee and elbow, my upper arm looked like a victim of a thousand cats and I took a good strike to the head(no concussion but my glasses are bent up now.)

Ride safe, because now I have an unconscious terror seeing any turn so that sucks.
 
Yeah, I was really skeptical about riding home from work the other day. It rained hard and the roads were wet enough to make my brakes almost non existent. I rode sub 10s all the way home.

If I can beat traffic I can make it home in 3 minutes without braking any laws
 
Now mind you the road was wet and sandy
That sandy part. That's what got you. Sand on pavement is just as bad as black ice, and it will wipe out a 900lb bagger motorcycle at 15mph if you hit it just right. I am extra alert and aware in the spring time when I first get my bikes out because of it - especially after a good rain, at least until they bring out the street sweepers.

Wet roads, yes you can lose traction to some degree, but you would be surprised at the level of grip still available on wet pavement. The only time water is really dangerous is when you start to hydroplane, which depends on a long list of factors. I have scraped the pegs on my Honda on a wet road and it takes approximately 57 degrees of lean angle to do that.
 
Yeppers they use sand here during the icy storms. Sand, light rain that brings oils up off the road, wide painted stripes. leaves all are to be carefully crossed. I've had a few slips/near misses but managed to keep upright.
 
I've got a strip where there is sand and gravel in front of my house. It is fairly packed in though, so it's not all over the road
 
I've also noticed tire pressure affects traction on these bikes, I run mine around 30 psi. a little soft, but it seems to grip much better. You loose a little efficiency, but who cares, you're not pedaling much. On the single tracks and downhill on the mountain bike I run them down to around 25ish psi. I used to ride light road bikes, and if you hit a pebble with those high psi tires it would upset them very easily. Glad you were not hurt too bad.
 
About three weeks or so I was riding a non motorized bicycle and I lost traction in a tight turn. Now mind you the road was wet and sandy and I was going a little above 30mph (if the bike computer is to be believed) but a tumble hurts all the same regardless of the road conditions. Twisted my derailleur hanger, bent the derailleur, scuffed the frame, handle bars swung around and bashed the mirror against my knuckles not to mention the damage I sustained.

Tore a hole in my jeans, skinned my knee and elbow, my upper arm looked like a victim of a thousand cats and I took a good strike to the head(no concussion but my glasses are bent up now.)

Ride safe, because now I have an unconscious terror seeing any turn so that sucks.
Exactly where on the road was you riding? Also do you mean tight curve? Because turns are made at right angles; 30 mph would be much to fast for that.
 
Exactly where on the road was you riding? Also do you mean tight curve? Because turns are made at right angles; 30 mph would be much to fast for that.
It's possible to take a standard corner at speed. You just need to utilize most of the road to do it, and have large hairy cahones.
 
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